Book Review: “Viruses and Vaccines: Smallpox to COVID-19” by Eric Grannis

All in all, this is a good book if you want to breeze through about 95 pages of information that is delivered clearly and in bite-size chunks. The images and graphics really help the story move along and be understandable. The language can be technical, but it is so only where it has to be. For the rest of the book, the language is not too technical and — again — makes the book understandable. Not only that, but the research is sound. Mr. Grannis received help Princeton Professor Martin H. Wühr to ensure its accuracy.

Our Instagram Feed

If you’ve been following History of Vaccines on Instagram, you might have noticed that we’ve been re-posting images of people around the world getting their COVID-19 vaccine. Like the Polio Pioneers back in the 1950s, these people are pioneers in the response to the COVID-19 pandemic. History will look back to these weeks to see how the vaccine roll-out went.

Keeping Track of COVID-19 Vaccination Rates

While individual states and localities have taken it upon themselves to report the number of cases, deaths and outbreaks of COVID-19, and now the number of vaccine doses given, very few national and international groups are aggregating the data. Perhaps the most famous source of aggregated information on COVID-19 cases is Johns Hopkins University and their dashboard. Another group that has been keeping good numbers by aggregating data from many different sources are the folks over at Our World in Data.

Pope Francis Calls for the Equitable Use of Coronavirus Vaccines to Fight the Pandemic

Public health campaigns in general and vaccination drives in particular are subject to all sorts of influences from the populations being vaccinated. From personal beliefs to institutional opinions, who gets vaccinated and when depends on many factors. As the world moves forward with COVID-19 vaccination, it will be interesting to note all the different sources of influence on how the public sees the vaccine and either rejects or accepts being vaccinated.