Smallpox Vaccination

The History of Variolation

The exact origins of variolation (also known as “inoculation”) are not well known. However, it is agreed that the practice started somewhere in Asia, in either China or India. (It is possible that it started in both places at around the same time.) In China, scabs from smallpox pustules would be dried in the sun and then inhaled by people seeking to be inoculated. The drying of the scabs would weaken the virus — or make less of it viable — and the inoculated person would (hopefully) not develop the full-blown symptoms of smallpox. In India, the method was similar to what would migrate west to the Middle East, North Africa and eventually Europe. That method involved lancing the pustule of someone recovering from smallpox and then using that same lance to transfer some of the pustule material (pus) into the arm of a healthy person.

Coronavirus (SARS CoV-2)

If you head over to the main History of Vaccines site, you’ll see that we have an Articles section where information on the known vaccine-preventable diseases is posted. In the last few years, two more vaccines have been authorized for use against their respective diseases: Ebola and Coronavirus. In this blog post, you will get a preview of the information that will soon be posted on the Coronavirus, albeit in a slightly different format than it is on the Articles section.